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Regenerating/renewing the SSH key for a known host which has been reinstalled

I ran into the following spiel when I attempted to SSH to a host just now:

Set the timezone of a Debian/Ubuntu server from the command-line

Setting the timezone of an Ubuntu (14.04, Trusty) or Debian (7, Wheezy) server from the command-line is simple. Just run dpkg-reconfigure tzdata and follow the on-screen prompts. However, if you are running an unattended installation, you might want to avoid interactive prompts and just gets the job done. To do this, simply run

$ sudo ln -sf /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/Anchorage /etc/localtime

Browse through /usr/share/zoneinfo/ to locate your timezone.

Disable pop-ups for an unattended/non-interactive apt-get install in Ubuntu/Debian

So, here I was writing a script that would automate the installation of a package in Ubuntu 14.04 and all was going swimmingly. Until I ran it. You know how some apt-get installs sometimes involve a technicolor pop-up that asks you for stuff? Well, those pop-ups interrupted my script which didn't proceed further. After much digging, I found that there are a couple of solutions for this:

bash: cannot set terminal process group (3987): Inappropriate ioctl for device bash: no job control in this shell

On a new Ubuntu 14.04 (Trusty) LTS server, I ran into the following:

$ su -c /bin/bash foo
bash: cannot set terminal process group (3987): Inappropriate ioctl for device
bash: no job control in this shell

However, the su procedure worked and I was logged in as user foo.

PHP Warning: Unknown: It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings

After upgrading a Debian install to use PHP 5.4, I ran into the following error:

Copy/pasting large amounts of text via a PuTTY terminal

While transferring a file to a remote server is pretty easily done using PuTTY's sister program, pscp, sometimes one finds oneself to be too lazy to go through the steps required. Shouldn't it be possible to simply copy and paste the (text) file into a remote editor via PuTTY? It is and it works a peach. However, it does crack the shits every now and then complaining about the length of the clipboard (paste).

Changing the charset/encoding of a file in Linux

An easy avenue in Windows to change the encoding of a file is to open it in Notepad and then use the Save As option which allows you to specify the encoding that the file should be saved using ...

Linux does offer a bunch of solutions too, albeit perhaps relatively less simple:

SVN: Remove/delete .svn directories recursively

Earlier today, I wanted to recover some files that I'd added to version control (for safe keeping). However, I did not want to retain the pesky .svn files that plague every directory in the tree (unlike the wonderful git). GOOG directed me to solutions that all rely on Linux tools to do the trick. The following does work admirably:

Picasa in Linux under WiNE without Google Plus support

The latest version of Picasa (v3.9) is armed with Google Plus support. I suppose that this is fine even though Google Plus is inherently evil (albeit not as evil as Facebook). However, the application's camera support is lacking and Google has officially stopped supporting the product under Linux. They've also pulled many of the links and even download sites and archive sites are oddly only providing v3.9. However, Google's own servers continue to (knowingly or unknowingly) host to install file for the admirable robust v3.8. Here it is:

Drupal XMLSiteMap: public://xmlsitemap/ not found or not writable

I ran into the following error (or something like it) while setting up Drupal's xmlsitemap module:

public://xmlsitemap/lOtsOfgoBBlDegOOk not found or not writable

This is as expected some kind of permissions issue. Why the module can't sort this on its own, I do not know. As with everything Drupal, clear the cache first to see if that fixes things. It sometimes does. If not, you will need to get your hands dirty on the commandline (if linux):

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